Redwoods in Stout Grove

Juggernaut in Redwood National and State Parks

Continued from: Coast Redwoods Main Page

Copyright 2016 - 2017 by Mario Vaden



The coast below, called Juggernaut, is located in the Prairie Creek redwood park. The view from this angle shows an ease for photo composition, very much like Gemini which also has open space around it. Several people have confused this with a new discovery Grogan's Fault (Spartan), possibly misinterpretting an abbreviated image file name at ENTS forums. But this was the only coast redwood I published as Juggernaut. You can visit the other redwood's page and see there is no resemblance ... a day & night difference. The other redwood is referenced at Wikipedia and conifers.org. We briefly gave this coast redwood another name for a few weeks while juggling nicknames (similar to how Fusion Giant eventually became Melkor, although Melkor's 2nd name took years rather than just weeks). Gerald Beranek, redwood author, refers to this one as Colossus (not the Super Colossus), and may have written that name before in one of his books.

Among all big coast redwoods this was the pick for my last business cards. The image was captured back in 2009. Presently another coast redwood Howland Hill Giant is on my large 4 x 6 business cards (the photo on the cover of 101 Things to Do magazine Southern Oregon and Del Norte / 2014). Continued below ...

 


Redwood Juggernaut in Redwood National and State Parks

 

Its doubtful sharing this redwood will affect foot traffic around it. If by chance you stumble upon this redwood, spare the walk around and find the existing small open patch to avoid ferns, sorrel or salal. This redwood is in the southeast part of the park within a 3 mile radius of the Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park visitor center. It should be visible from the parkway but you could miss it if distracted by other scenery passing through.

Facing this trunk's most exposed side there is a small burl about 25 feet up from the ground and no extra stems of any size for at least 100 feet or more. The main bole is relatively streamlined with a moderate taper.